Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference on Health Informatics and Technology New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Abdul Malik Shakir

Hi3 Solutions, USA

Keynote: Standards Driven Healthcare Information Integration Infrastructure

Time : 09:40-10:30

OMICS International Healthcare Informatics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Abdul Malik Shakir photo
Biography:

Mr. Abdul Malik Shakir is a recognized industry expert in healthcare information management. His information technology experience spans more than four decades, including 35+ years in healthcare. His professional experience includes development of enterprise information architectures, data warehouses / business intelligence applications, systems integration solutions, and expertise in electronic data interchange standards. Mr. Shakir’s consulting experience includes providing advisory services and expert assistance to large-scale healthcare provider organizations and integrated delivery networks. He has contributed to the advancement of healthcare related standards through volunteer participation in Health Level Seven International (HL7), the X12N Healthcare Task Group, the OMG Healthcare Domain Task Force, the Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange (WEDI), and the IEEE Joint Workgroup for a Common Data Model.

Abstract:

Healthcare information exchange, integration, and analytic capabilities are critical to safe, cost effective, high quality healthcare. The technical infrastructure that serves as an enableler for these capabilities is a complex array of data exchange standards, clinical teminologies, and decision support technologies. This presentation provides an overview of this technical infrastructure and current and emerging technologies. In the area of data exchange standards the presentation will explore the major standards development orgnizations – HL7, X12, IEEE, ASTM, NCPDP, and DICOM; clinical terminologies – ICD, SNOMED, LOINC, RxNORM, and CPT; and technologies – integration engines, terminology servers, standards conformance validators, integrated data repositories, and business intelligence tools. The mission of Hi3 Solutions is to support continuous improvements in healthcare outcomes by providing software solutions and professional services that enable our clients to discover, share, and measure compliance with evidence-based best practices in medicine. The products and services provided by Hi3 Solutions facilitate the use of healthcare information management technology standards designed to enable semantic clinical interoperability.

OMICS International Healthcare Informatics 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Gerson Chadi photo
Biography:

Professor Gerson Chadi, MD. PHD., is Full Professor at the Department of Neurology of the University of Sao Paulo Medical School (USP), Brazil, since 1998. He specialized in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Advanced Research on Regeneration of Central Nervous System (CNS) at Karolinska Institute, Sweden (1991-1994), and also at the Clarke Inst of Psychiatry of Univ of Toronto and at the Montreal Neurological Inst of the McGill Univ (1999). He introduced in Brazil the concepts and research methods in the CNS Regeneration (1994) and was one of the signatories of the Beijing Letter which created the Neurorestauratology Discipline in the field of Neurology. He heads the Translational Neurology Unit, the Translational Neurology Laboratory and the Neuroregeneration Research Center at Dep of Neurology of USP. He coordinates the Neurological Genomic Project and the Cell Therapy Project of his Medical School. He introduced the first Brazilian Systematic Translational Research on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, bench to bed, side 2010), being responsible for various clinical and laboratory projects on ALS research. He published more than 100 scientific peer reviewed papers in International Scientific Journals, graduated over than 60 Master, PhD and post doctoral students.

Abstract:

The detailed mechanisms related to neurodegeneration in eurodegenerative disorders are still unknown. The methodology to study genetic, molecular and cellular events of human neurological diseases is current under development, increasing the expectation the discovery of therapeutic targets that allow effective translation of proposed clinical trials. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that leads to widespread motor neuron death, general palsy and respiratory failure. We have developed the methodology to allow gene expression modeling of sporadic ALS, the most prevalent form of disease, by employing human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-differentiated motor neurons linked to DAVID Functional Annotation Bioinformatics Microarray Analysis using a whole human genome platform. DAVID analyses of differentially expressed genes identified molecular function/biological process-related genes through Gene Ontology terms, summarized by REVIGO, and also genes related to KEGG signaling pathways. Specific software for Protein Interaction Network Analysis showed the degree of interaction of deregulated gene expression. The overall analysis showed a strong association between mitochondrial function and cellular processes possibly related to motor neuron degeneration. Supported by: FAPESP and CNPq, Brazil.

Break: 11:10-11:30

  • Track 1:Healthcare Informatics
    Track 7:Health Informatics Management
Location: Crown Plaza New Orleans AIrport

Session Introduction

Julie Lindenberg

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, USA

Title: Best Practices to Improve Adolescent Well Care Rates

Time : 11:30-12:00

Speaker
Biography:

Julie A Lindenberg is a Family Nurse Practitioner. Her academic degrees include a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from The University of Delaware, a Master of Science in Nursing from The University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, and a Doctor of Nursing Practice from Columbia University where she received the Macy Foundation Scholarship. She is working as an Associate Professor of Clinical Nursing at UTHealth in Houston for 23 years. She has served as a Clinical Quality Manager for RediClinic and as Director of The University of Texas Health Services.

Abstract:

Evidence suggests that adolescents do not return for recommended yearly wellness exams, unless prompted. This creates a missed opportunity for providers to coordinate a medical home and to help reduce risky behaviors in teenagers. Identified barriers to use medical homes among families with adolescents age 11-18 include obstacles to scheduling or keeping appointments, which include: lack of cooperation from teen, parental work conflicts, child care needs, lack of transportation, and lack of night and weekend appointment availability. These issues of accessibility can be addressed via various health communication innovations and technologies, including a comprehensive patient information portal, electronic messaging access to the health care provider and family centred internet and video health information resources. Other impediments to adolescent wellness care include continuity of care, comprehensive care, and coordination of care issues, which can be approached technologically with patient appointment and referral tracking systems and a comprehensive electronic risk assessment software. By implementing the above operational and scheduling strategies, primary care providers of adolescents can reduce barriers to use of the medical home, improve outreach to the teen and his/her family, and, ultimately improve adolescent wellness by ensuring that the patient stay connected to a medical home.

Speaker
Biography:

Kimberly Denney is an accomplished senior executive and global commercial leader with more than two decades of continuous success in leading international commercial operations, with a focus in the healthcare and medical device industries. She is an expert in building winning market strategies and directing operations to drive sustainable revenue generation. In 2015, Kimberly published her dissertation on Assessing Clinical Software User’s Needs for Improved Clinical Decision Support Tools. Kimberly was admitted as a member of the Golden Key International Honor Society in recognition of her outstanding career and her prominence as a thought leader.

Abstract:

Previous research identified the average primary care physician sees more than 60 alerts per day requiring nearly an hour of their clinic time to manage. With 90% of those alerts considered unwarranted, improved CDS tools are vital to supporting transitions to value based care and the active engagement of providers. A recent quantitative correlation study focused on physician perceptions of CPOE alerts found a statistically significant affect between elements of alert design and perceived value in improving adherence to ACO quality measures. Application of sociotechnical considerations in the design of provider alerts coupled with near-real-time analytics provides organizations assuming greater financial risk with tools to reduce waste and inappropriate care while supporting improvements in care quality. This presentation will describe the findings from this quantitative correlation research study. A brief demonstration of a novel, advanced alert analytics platform will highlight how organizations might close the loop with their providers to achieve a clinical and financial return on their EHR investments.

Jeff Garrett

University of Auckland, New Zealand

Title: Can technology improve health outcomes in COPD patients?

Time : 12:30-13:00

Speaker
Biography:

Jeff Garrett is an associate professor in respiratory medicine at University of Auckland, New Zealand. His research interest includes asthma, COPD, bronchiectasis, chronic cough, lung cancer, lung infections, endoscopy - bronchoscopy, immigration. He published 55 research papers in International Journals.

Abstract:

Telehealth interventions can be shown to improve health outcomes for patients with COPD but economic benefits are marginal. New technologies and models of care are therefore required. We undertook a feasibility study by recruiting 60 COPD patients into a randomised controlled trial to assess the impact of a robot in the home. The robot was capable of recording lung function, oximetry, questionnaires, and reminded patients to take the medications daily and to undertake regular exercise. Entertainment and relaxation functions were incorporated as well as educational measures to encourage healthy behaviour. The device was linked to smartinhalers (Adherium) that monitored patient adherence with inhaled therapy and a mobility app to monitor activity and sleep. There was also a method to allow the patient to communicate directly with the healthcare team. Data was regularly collected by the robot once a week and checked by the physiotherapists on the server. The patients randomised to usual care received smartinhaler evaluation to assess adherence but the information was not used to aid management. The hypothesis we are testing is that the group randomised to receive the robot will have fewer exacerbations and when they do develop worsening respiratory symptoms, will receive more rapid health care intervention and therefore fewer hospitalisations. We predict that the extra support will result in lower anxiety, reduced loneliness and improved adherence with both exercise and medical treatment. Outcome data will be in the final stages of collection at the time of the meeting and the main emphasis of this presentation will be on the intervention.

Break: 13:10-14:00

Evelyn H. Thrasher

Western Kentucky University, USA

Title: An Empirical Investigation of Integration in Healthcare Alliance Networks

Time : 14:00-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Evelyn Thrasher is Associate Professor of Information Systems in the Gordon Ford College of Business at Western Kentucky University. She serves as Director of the Professional Education and Knowledge Program and as the Knicely Faculty Fellow in Leadership. She holds a BS in Mathematics from East Tennessee State University and an MBA and PhD in Management Information Systems from Auburn University. She has published in Communications of the AIS, Decision Support Systems, Hospital Topics, and other journals, and has presented at numerous national conferences. Her research focuses on the strategic management of IT to achieve positive outcomes in healthcare.

Abstract:

Healthcare alliance networks have developed rapidly in the US. Yet, research has not kept pace. This study examines two interrelated healthcare research needs—the value of information technology (IT) and the complementarity of IT with process and decision-making (PDM) integration. Hypotheses relate (i) IT integration, (ii) PDM integration, and (iii) alliance network integration (complementarity of i and ii) to performance. The mixed results lend support to the complementarity of IT with PDM integration and call for a more holistic perspective of the healthcare alliance network.

Thompson H. Boyd

Hahnemann University Hospital, USA

Title: Data Analytics: Governance is Key – is your Data Safe and Fit?

Time : 14:30-15:00

Speaker
Biography:

Thompson H. Boyd, III, M.D. completed Medical School at the University of Virginia and went to Hahnemann Medical College in for training in Internal Medicine. As a practicing Internist for over 25 years, Dr. Boyd has devoted 100% of his time as a Clinical Informaticist, and in 2013, was part of the first class to be certified in Clinical Informatics. He serves with HIMSS in a number of Public Policy initiatives, and is co-Chair of the HIMSS Privacy and Security Public Policy Task Force, and is a member of the HIMSS Annual Education and Conference Committee.

Abstract:

Healthcare Organizations received a “call to action” in March 2015 when Secretary Burwell stated that 85% of Medicare dollars paid was to be tied to Value in 2016, and 90% of Medicare dollars paid was to be tied to Value in 2018. In 2019, under The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA) of 2015 goes into effect where Physician payment will be more closely tied to value and population health. Organization need to have robust Data Paralytics engines where queries can be answered and provided to the clinician at the point of care. Most important, the data needs to be trusted by the stakeholders for data to flow and be successfully used and consumed. Resources must be devoted to data provenance and to data integrity. A business case is central to the sharing of data. Systems must be secure, and security risk assessments need to be performed, where an aggressive mitigation plan is in effect. Cybersecurity risks need to be managed by in a number of ways, including the sharing of threat information among stakeholders, participation in federal/private initiatives, and undergoing formal analysis such as penetration testing. Patients also need to be in control of who sees their data, and what data is seen by whom? A patient should never be surprise to see that their data is in an unintended location.

Amanda Brief

my.Flow Inc., USA

Title: Obliterating Menstrual Anxiety and Shame

Time : 15:00-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Amanda Brief completed her Bachelors in Biology & Society from Cornell University and later, her Master of Engineering (MEng) in Industrial Engineering and & Operations Research from UC Berkeley. It was at Berkeley, last year, that she was part of a class project team at the Center for Innovation Technology and Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS) that developed an early prototype of a tampon monitor, which could monitor fullness level with the intention of sending the tampon wearer their saturation data in real time. This turned into her startup, my.Flow, Inc., which got picked up by HAX Hardware Accelerator in early 2016, where she and her team received a grant in order to devote themselves to full time development of a fully functional tampon monitor that will aggregate data for women everywhere in a way that has never before been possible. Ms. Brief’s interests and experience had occupied the women’s health and advocacy spaces even prior to founding my.Flow. She was a counselor and trainer of counselors for the EARS peer anxiety reach out hotline at Cornell, and an active member of the Vagina Monologues movement. She interned at Rockland Family Shelter, working with survivors of domestic abuse. After her studies she was a research assistant at Columbia University Medical Center and Beth Israel Medical Center, with emphases in neurobiology and mental health disorders. Ever since she went back to school to do her Post-Baccalaureate studies in engineering, she sought to combine her predilections for both quantitative and outreach related endeavors, and has found this in my.Flow.

Abstract:

my.Flow seeks to change the conversation around menstruation. Currently a pervasively taboo topic, it is something (over) half the world’s population experiences every month, for decades. We want to empower women through insight, helping them to learn their flow. Menstrual innovation is embarrassingly lagging; it’s about time women had a smart device to prevent both staining/leakage, and infection related to leaving their tampons in too long. We are leveraging technological improvements in the realm of sensing and circuitry to create a tampon monitor, which alerts its user as to the saturation level of her tampon via a notification on her phone. What’s so prolific about it being ‘smart’ is that it’s the first tampon of its kind. The user experience aim is convenience – currently, you can’t check the level of your tampon, so many women err on the side of taking their tampon out prematurely, which is not only wasteful, but also quite physically uncomfortable. Our market research shows that over half of women would buy a product that would help them prevent staining/leakage on their period, waste/excess spending due to premature removal of their hygiene product, and a product that would help them predict when their period would stop and start each cycle, the heaviness of their period on a given day, and a whopping 82% are ready to buy a product that would help them prevent Toxic Shock Syndrome and other menstrual-related complications.

Speaker
Biography:

Julie M Kapp, MPH, PhD is an Associate Professor with a background in Public Health and Evaluation. Her faculty appointments have included notable roles, such as: the Executive Director of the Health and Behavioral Risk Research Center, Margaret Proctor Mulligan Faculty Scholar, and Executive Director of the Partnership for Evaluation, Assessment, and Research. She has served as an NIH grant reviewer, an Associate Editor for BMC Cancer, and a journal reviewer for such notable titles as Cancer, International Journal of Cancer, and The Lancet. She recently completed a year-long Malcolm Baldrige Executive Fellows Program focused on aligning and integrating systems.

Abstract:

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) has generated attention for programs that drive a systems-engineering approach to health-related services. The term complex adaptive systems (CAS) acknowledges, programs and activities are not conducted in vacuums, but are part of larger networks, with histories and evolving dynamics. Systems-thinking considers how components within a larger structure operate and interact over the life cycle of the system; and how to optimize the design, implementation, and evaluation of that system. A ‘system’ can be defined as “a group of interacting, interrelated, and interdependent components that form a complex and unified whole.” To evaluate the population-level impact of programs requires a CAS-perspective, but also presents an enormous informatics challenge. We use the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program, as created by Section 2951 of the ACA, as a case study for illustration. MIECHV is intended to provide comprehensive services to pregnant women and at risk parents of children (birth to age 5) through home visiting programs. With all states receiving formula funds to address their at-risk communities, and home visiting programs having been in existence for decades, evaluating the effectiveness of these programs becomes a CAS and informatics challenge.